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Vaccination and screening are the keys to eliminate cervical cancer

Vaccination and screening are the keys to eliminate cervical cancer

Tuesday 18 January 2022

Vaccination and screening are the keys to eliminate cervical cancer

Tuesday 18 January 2022


Public health officials are using Cervical Cancer Prevention Week to encourage vaccination in secondary school students and screening in adults in an effort to eliminate cervical cancer in the Bailiwick.

The islands offer all children aged 12-13 vaccination against Human Papilloma Virus (HPV), which is the cause of nearly all cervical cancers. And screening for cervical cancer is available between the ages of 25 and 65.

The States said: "Screening is widely offered and our recommendation for testing extends to all people with a cervix including women, transgendered men, people who are intersex and people who are non-binary. If you have not had a full hysterectomy or removal of your cervix then you should still get tested."

Dr Nicola Brink, Medical Officer of Health, said: "Each year in Guernsey and Alderney, approximately five new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed with approximately one to two deaths from cervical cancer recorded per year.

"The cervical screening programme, together with our HPV vaccination programme, will help us move towards our goal of eliminating cervical cancer in the Bailiwick."

Dr Nicola Brink

Pictured: Dr Nicola Brink, Medical Officer of Health, is encouraging vaccination against HPV and screening for cervical cancer. Cervical Cancer Prevention Week is from 17-23 January. 

Vaccination and screening is free of charge.

Public Health Practitioner for Screening, Diane Mathews, said: "In a time when many of us are worrying about our money, it’s a real relief and positive that these services which can help prevent cervical cancer are completely free of charge."

Cervical cancer develops when abnormal cells in the lining of the cervix - the lower part of the womb - grow in an uncontrolled way and eventually form a growth which can spread into the surrounding areas or to other areas of the body.

HPV is the cause of nearly all cervical cancers because it can cause abnormal cells which can develop into cancer.

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